Making a decision when and whether to start professional or vocational training in aviation such as a Type Rating, Engineering Degree or Flight Instructor Certificate is a big decision. For the employer knowing how many pilots or engineers are in the system helps recruiting and management teams plan what resources they will need to commit to your training programs and when.

This page, starting with the stats in the U.K. is a valuable resource for both employers and jobseekers showing everything from the number of active ATPL’s in circulation to the number of new pilots graduating the UK’s flying schools in the last year.

 

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Source : UK CAA – www.caa.co.uk

When reading the figures above it should be noted that the figures for new issues are anomalous in 2014 (and less so in 2013) due to the switchover from JAR to EASA. The peak of ‘new’ issues was actually current JAR licence holders switching to EASA. In our opinion the numbers of actual new issues were inline with adjacent years.

 

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Source : UK CAA – www.caa.co.uk

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Source : UK CAA – www.caa.co.uk

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Source : FAA – www.faa.gov

The US employment market is generally a more nimble market than most other markets due generally less employee based regulation. This means that it tends to lead the rest of the world in employment trends. This is set against the one off seismic change by the FAA in 2013 in the wake of the Colgan Air accident (in Buffalo, NY) to a 1,500 hours minimum rule for the issue of the ATP or slightly less if pilots qualified for the R-ATP.